Is “human decency” the punchline?

Tumblr has been going all social justice the past week, thanks to Senator Wendy Davis’ filibuster on blocking the Texan bill that would severely restrict access to abortion and abortion clinics. Luckily, and I heavily emphasize the word luckily, common sense and the slightest bit of respect for women won out, and the bill was struck down.

Way to go, Wendy! :)

Moreover, on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, rape jokes have come up again as a heated topic of discussion. You get the usual bigots who say that rape jokes are just jokes, and if you can’t handle it, don’t pay the money to see the show. Then you also get the folk who do have human decency and say that, hey, rape jokes aren’t funny.

In a society that’s supposed to be post-Enlightenment, we really are anything but. When the statistic came up saying that 40% of households have women earning more money than men, the country goes berserk, saying how these crazy feminists are taking over the world, etc. Excuse me, read it again. 40% of households have women earning more than men.

That means that 60% of households still have men who are the main breadwinner.

When I read this, I was shocked. I wasn’t shocked because, ooh, women are going to be ruling Wall Street. I was shocked that this was classified as news or a new finding.

What the heck?! All this says is that “men are the main breadwinner in most homes”. How is that news in any way?

Or is it news because, oh no, women are actually getting closer and closer to having equal financial power in the home? If that’s the kicker, then surely we must be in the Dark Ages.

I’m even more shocked at this CNN article titled “When rape jokes aren’t funny“, which talks about the poor and tactless performance of Daniel Tosh. With that title, it’s as if rape jokes were funny in the first place. Which they weren’t, aren’t, and will never be. Either the CNN writer deliberately did this, or that rape culture is so ingrained in our society that it has gone unnoticed.

But CNN is a giant news network! It must have star reporters or excellent writers to have seen the errors. Surely this tasteless mistake should not have slipped, but it did. With the prestige of the network in mind, I almost think that it’s a tongue-in-cheek.

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What’s the difference between a baby and a watermelon?

The following is a screencap from this Facebook thread, which you should all click “report” on because it is disgusting how some people can see this as a joke.

The punch line is in the picture as well. (Trigger warning: there is mention of gore and sex.)

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I purposely didn’t colour-block the first names because anyone who goes to York University must see this, especially the administrators.

Is this the type of student you want at your school?

Moreover, to the York University students:

Is this the type of person you want to be working with?

What scared me the most, and continues to scare me as I look back on this post, is how nobody intercepted. Nobody thought it was wrong to joke about dead babies or rape. Everyone in this thread went along with it and thought they were having a great time.

There was absolutely no reason (nor will there ever be one) to have jokes about dead babies and violent gore. What purpose does it serve? Does it advance you to your goal? Death is no laughing matter. There are cases where studies have shown that “nervous laughter” is used to relieve tension, and that is the only reason I can think of here, but does it really seem like laughing because they are scared of death, or does it seem to show their ignorance and lack of empathy?

Ask any parents or any person about a deceased sibling, relative, or friend. Is death such a funny matter then? Would it be funny to any of these people in the thread, Yahya I., Husman S. H., Sam P. G., or Shafay A. if their own child were to die in front of them, to breathe their last breath?

And then of course, the sex joke from Shafay A.:

Q: What’s 6 inches long, 2 inches wide, and drives women wild?

A: A $100 bill!

Not only is that supposed to imply sex, it also dehumanizes women into sex objects with no personality who hunger after money.

What sickens me the most is the difficulty to file a complaint to York. This guy clearly violates the following responsibilities under the Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities:

(ii) The responsibility to behave in a way that does not harm or threaten to harm
another person’s physical or mental wellbeing.
(iii) The responsibility to uphold an atmosphere of civility, honesty, equity and
respect for others, thereby valuing the inherent diversity in our community.

This Facebook thread is not the only instance where Yahya I. has violated these responsibilities. In another thread, my friend, N, had unfollowed the thread but he tagged her back in:

Y: hey, N

N: can i help you?

Y: rape

That is literally what happened. Then he said that it was only a joke and we should loosen up.

Rape is never funny. 

I really hope that York rethinks their process for accepting students. Yahya I. is the scum of the earth.

Joining the Illuminati…

I know what you’re thinking. “She’s joining a Satanic group!!”

First off, Satanism is totally not what this group is about, but I can understand why some people see the Illuminati is a good thing.

Let me just state right now that I am not high or on acid or under any influence of a drug or substance. The Illuminati is looking like to be a pretty good group to be part of, and in fact, very progressive (even in today’s age). People may post “Ooh that guy’s from the Illuminati”, and you know what, it should be taken as a compliment.

This is from the Wikipedia article. I know that Wikipedia should be pretty much every teacher’s most hated text, but for general knowledge, it’s so wonderful:

The Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, “enlightened”) is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious. Historically the name refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on May 1, 1776 to oppose superstitionprejudice, religious influence over public life, abuses of state power, and to support women’s education and gender equality.

Technically, we are already all part of the Illuminati. Atheism has been sweeping mainstream media, and is no longer shunned. In fact, the tables have turned and atheism is considered the dominant belief system, and religious individuals (fundamentalist or not) are being seen as zealots.

Superstition has long been shunned before religion was, and we are currently pursuing the goal of “equality for all“: not just between men and women, but for various genders as well. We have been against the abuse of state power and manipulation through politics for ages, and we react strongly against such indecencies (see Mike Duffy and Rob Ford).

We also support education for all for individuals across the socioeconomic status spectrum: gender, class, wealth, income, cultural capital, etc. We see education not only for the privileged, but that everyone deserves a right to receive education. The only question now is education quality.

However, popular media has been construing the Illuminati as this conspiracy group that wants to snipe off governments and impose a New World Order. Typical. People usually accuse the progressives being conspiracy theorists for anything and everything.

I really hope that increasingly more people realize that the origin of the Illuminati is really for equality and equity for all, and to rid the world of prejudice and abuse. Because, really…

Is that not what we all want? 

Of course, I don’t mean to actually join or apply to be in the group/”secret society” (how secret can it be if so many people know about it?), but it’s fun to entertain the idea.

After all, we’re heading in the same direction anyway.